House Clearance Barking London E6

  • House Clearance London
    House Clearance London

Affordable House Clearance Barking London E6, single items – full loads. For an obligation free estimate call: 020 3589 0314 Price from just £50

House Clearance Barking London E6

Ben and Terry’s will remove all kinds of rubbish from your home and garden.

We can get rid of any old furniture, clear cuttings from your garden, takeaway rubbish after home improvement or renovation works, help de-clutter your property ready for sale or let, or simply remove your old sofa to make room for your new one.

Using Ben and Terry’s House Clearance Barking London E6 service is the affordable and stress free way to remove your rubbish.

Prices start from as little as £50 and are based on the amount of our vehicle you fill. Unlike skip hire you pay for the space you use and there are no hidden fees for skip permits or parking suspensions.

Each house clearance team has two men who are fully insured to load from any location in and around your home.

Popular House Clearance Barking London E6 services include:

House clearance

Garage clearance

Garden clearance

Loft clearance

Basement clearance

Offering you a bespoke service to suit both your needs and budget.

At Ben and Terry’s we guarantee that all rubbish we collect is disposed of responsibly with over 98% recycled or reused.

Unsure how much space you need?

No problem, simply call our House Clearance Barking London E6 customer service team on: 020 3589 0314 who will be happy to offer help and advice.

 

Facts about Barking London E6

Barking is a suburban town and forms part of the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. It was historically a fishing and agrarian settlement in the county of Essex. Its economic history is characterised by a shift to market gardening, and industrial development to the south adjacent to the River Thames. The railway station opened in 1854 and served by the London Underground since 1908. As part of the suburban growth of London in the 20th century, Barking significantly expanded and increased in population, primarily due to the development of the London County Council estate at Becontree in the 1920s. In addition to an extensive and fairly low-density residential area, the town centre forms a large retail and commercial district, currently a focus for regeneration. The former industrial lands to the south are being redeveloped as Barking Riverside.

History

Its name came from Anglo-Saxon Berecingas, meaning either “the settlement of the followers or descendants of a man called Bereca” or “the settlement by the birch trees”. In AD 735 the town was Berecingum and was known to mean “dwellers among the birch trees”. By AD 1086, it had become Berchingae as evidenced by the town’s entry in the Domesday Book.

In British slang “Barking” is short for “barking mad”, and Barking is sometimes cited as the origin of the phrase, attributed to the alleged existence of a medieval insane asylum attached to Barking Abbey. However, the phrase first appeared in the 20th century. A more likely derivation is from comparing an insane person to a mad dog.
 

Fishing

Fishing was the most important industry from the 14th century until the mid-19th. Fishermen sailed as far as Iceland in the summer. They served Billingsgate Fish Market in the City of London, and moored in Barking Pool.

Until about 1870 the trade was mostly in live fish, using welled smacks in which the central section of the hull, between two watertight bulkheads, was pierced to create a ‘well’ in which seawater could circulate. Cod caught live were lowered into this well, with their swim bladders pierced, and remained alive until the vessel returned to port, when they were transferred to semi-submerged ‘chests,’ effectively cages, which kept them alive until they were ready for sale. At this point they were pulled out and killed with a blow on the head before being dispatched to market, where because of their freshness they commanded a high price. People who practised this method of fishing became known as ‘codbangers.’

By 1850 there some 220 smacks, employing some 1,370 men and boys. The boats were typically 75 feet (23 m) long carrying up to 50 tons. During the wars of the 17th and 18th century, the Royal Navy often used the boats as fleet auxiliaries, based at nearby Chatham Dockyard.

England’s Biggest Fishing Fleet

Samuel Hewett, born on 7 December 1797, founded the Short Blue Fleet (England’s biggest fishing fleet) based in Barking, and using smacks out of Barking and east coast ports. Around 1870 this fleet changed to gaff ketches that stayed out at sea for months, using ice for preservation of fish produced by flooding local fields in winter. Fleeting involved fish being ferried from fishing smacks to steamer carriers by little wooden ferry-boats. The rowers had to stand as the boats were piled high with fish boxes. Rowers refused to wear their bulky cork lifejackets because it slowed down their rowing. At first the fast 50-foot gaff cutters with great booms projecting beyond the sterns raced the fish to port to get the best prices.

Fishing Decline

The opening of rail links between the North Sea ports and London meant it was quicker to transport fish by train straight to the capital rather than waiting for ships to take the longer route down the east coast and up the River Thames. By the 1850s the fish kept in chests died quickly due to the sever pollution of the Thames. Consequently, the fishery slipped into decline in the second half of the nineteenth century. The decline hastened by a storm in December 1863, off the Dutch coast, which caused the deaths of 60 men and damage estimated at £6–7000. Many of its leading figures, including Hewett & Co, moved to Great Yarmouth and Grimsby.

By 1900 Barking had ceased to be a fishing port, leaving only street and pub names and a large modern steel sculpture entitled “The Catch” as a reminder of its former importance. The sculpture is on the roundabout at the end of Fanshawe Avenue. The local fishing heritage remains at Valence House Museum.
 

Thames Disaster

On 3 September 1878 the iron ship Bywell Castle ran into the pleasure steamer Princess Alice in Gallions Reach, downstream of Barking Creek. The paddle steamer was returning from the coast via Sheerness and Gravesend with nearly 800 day trippers. She broke in two and sank immediately, with the loss of more than 600 lives, the highest single loss of civilian lives in UK territorial waters. At this time there was no official body responsible for marine safety in the Thames, the official enquiry resolving that the Marine Police Force based at Wapping should acquire steam launches to replace their rowing boats and making them more able to perform rescues.

Source: Wikipedia