House Clearance Bow London E3

  • House Clearance London
    House Clearance London

Affordable House Clearance Bow London E3, single items – full loads. For an obligation free estimate call: 020 3589 0314 Price from just £50

House Clearance Bow London E3

Ben and Terry’s will remove all kinds of rubbish from your home and garden.

We can get rid of any old furniture, clear cuttings from your garden, takeaway rubbish after home improvement or renovation works, help de-clutter your property ready for sale or let, or simply remove your old sofa to make room for your new one.

Using Ben and Terry’s House Clearance Bow London E3 service is the affordable and stress free way to remove your rubbish.

Prices start from as little as £50 and are based on the amount of our vehicle you fill. Unlike skip hire you pay for the space you use and there are no hidden fees for skip permits or parking suspensions.

Each house clearance team has two men who are fully insured to load from any location in and around your home.

Popular House Clearance Bow London E3 services include:

House clearance

Garage clearance

Garden clearance

Loft clearance

Basement clearance

Offering you a bespoke service to suit both your needs and budget.

At Ben and Terry’s we guarantee that all rubbish we collect is disposed of responsibly with over 98% recycled or reused.

Unsure how much space you need?

No problem, simply call our House Clearance Bow London E3 customer service team on: 020 3589 0314 who will be happy to offer help and advice.

 

Facts about Bow London E3

Bow is a district in east London, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is built-up and mostly residential.

The area was formerly known as Stratford, and “Bow” is an abbreviation of the medieval name Stratford-atte-Bow, in which “Bow” refers to a bridge built in the early 12th century. Bow is adjacent to the London 2012 Olympic Park, less than a mile away. A section of the district is part of the park.

Bow underwent extensive urban re-generation including the replacement or improvement of council homes, such redevelopment and rejuvenation coinciding with the staging of the 2012 Olympic Games at nearby Stratford.

History

Bridges at Bowe

Stratforde was first recorded as a settlement in 1177, the name derived from its Old English meaning of paved way to a ford. The ford originally laid on a pre-Roman trackway at Old Ford about 600 metres to the north, but when the Romans decided on Colchester as the initial capital for their occupation, the road was upgraded to run from the area of London Bridge, as one of the first paved Roman roads in Britain.

In 1110 Matilda, wife of Henry I, reputedly took a tumble at the ford on her way to Barking Abbey, and ordered a distinctively bow-shaped, three-arched bridge to be built over the River Lea, The like of which had not been seen before. The area had various different names and over time the name shortened to Bow to distinguish it from Stratford Langthorne on the Essex bank of the Lea.

Railways

In 1843 the engineer William Bridges Adams founded the Fairfield Locomotive Works, where he specialized in light engines, steam railcars (or railmotors) and inspection trolleys, including the Fairfield steam carriage for the Bristol and Exeter Railway and the Enfield for the Eastern Counties Railway. The business failed and the works closed circa 1872, later becoming the factory of Bryant and May.

Bow was the headquarters of the North London Railway, which opened its locomotive and carriage workshops in 1853. There were two stations, Old Ford and Bow. During World War 2 the NLR abandoned the branch from Dalston to Poplar through Bow due to sustaining substantial damage during the blitz.

Bow station opened in 1850 and then rebuilt in 1870 in a grand style, designed by Edwin Henry Horne and featuring a concert hall that was 100 ft long (30 m) and 40 ft wide (12 m). This became The Bow and Bromley Institute, then in 1887 the East London Technical College and a Salvation Army hall in 1911. From the 1930s it became the Embassy Billiard Hall and after the war became the Bow Palais, but a fire in 1956 destroyed the building.

Source: Wikipedia