House Clearance Chingford London E4

  • House Clearance London
    House Clearance London

Affordable House Clearance Chingford London E4, single items – full loads. For an obligation free estimate call: 020 3589 0314 Price from just £50

House Clearance Chingford London E4

Ben and Terry’s will remove all kinds of rubbish from your home and garden.

We can get rid of any old furniture, clear cuttings from your garden, takeaway rubbish after home improvement or renovation works, help de-clutter your property ready for sale or let, or simply remove your old sofa to make room for your new one.

Using Ben and Terry’s House Clearance Chingford London E4 service is the affordable and stress free way to remove your rubbish.

Prices start from as little as £50 and are based on the amount of our vehicle you fill. Unlike skip hire you pay for the space you use and there are no hidden fees for skip permits or parking suspensions.

Each house clearance team has two men who are fully insured to load from any location in and around your home.

Popular House Clearance Chingford London E4 services include:

House clearance

Garage clearance

Garden clearance

Loft clearance

Basement clearance

Offering you a bespoke service to suit both your needs and budget.

At Ben and Terry’s we guarantee that all rubbish we collect is disposed of responsibly with over 98% recycled or reused.

Unsure how much space you need?

No problem, simply call our House Clearance Chingford London E4 customer service team on: 020 3589 0314 who will be happy to offer help and advice.

 

Facts about Chingford London E4

Chingford is a district of the London Borough of Waltham Forest in East London. Historically a rural Essex parish, it gained urban district status in 1894, and between 1938 and 1965 formed the core of the Municipal Borough of Chingford. Chingford is close to the Essex border of Epping Forest District.

History

The River Ching runs through the area, and the town of Chingford is close to a number of fords of that river. However, old maps and descriptions give a name for the settlement long before the naming of the river and it is likely that the name of the river as “Ching” arose long after the naming of the settlement. It is also thought that, similarly to how Kingston upon Thames appears in Domesday Book of 1086 as Chingestone and Chingetun(e), with ching being old English for king, that Chingford could refer to the King’s river, and Kings Ford. This idea is compounded by links to royalty using the area for hunting in centuries gone by. However, the most generally accepted explanation by place name genealogists is that the settlement’s name has its origin as “Shingly Ford”—that is, a ford over a waterway containing shingles.

“The Sirloin”

A green area at the bottom of Friday Hill situates Pimp Hall Dovecote and viewed by entering the Pimp Hall Nature Reserve. The dovecote, which had nesting space for 250 birds, belonged to Pimp Hall (originally Pympe’s Hall), one of three manor houses around Chingford. There is a local legend telling how on one occasion Charles II was out hunting in Epping Forest and was caught in a snowstorm. He took shelter in Pimp Hall and was so delighted with the food offered him that he jocularly drew his sword and knighted the joint of beef declaring that it was now Sir Loin. Either this story caused the nearby pub on Friday Hill to be called “The Sirloin” or vice versa.

True North

A granite obelisk at Pole Hill, erected in 1824 under the direction of the Astronomer Royal, to mark true north for the telescopes of the Royal Observatory at Greenwich, south of the Thames. It was placed on high ground along the line of the Greenwich Meridian, but when this was recalibrated later in the 19th century, the obelisk was deemed to have been erected 19 feet (5.8 m) west of the revised meridian line. Today, an adjoining triangulation pillar marks the modern line.

Source: Wikipedia