House Clearance Hackney Central London E8

 

  • House Clearance London
    House Clearance London

Affordable House Clearance Hackney Central London E8, single items – full loads. For an obligation free estimate call: 020 3589 0314 Price from just £50

House Clearance Hackney Central London E8

Ben and Terry’s will remove all kinds of rubbish from your home and garden.

We can get rid of any old furniture, clear cuttings from your garden, takeaway rubbish after home improvement or renovation works, help de-clutter your property ready for sale or let, or simply remove your old sofa to make room for your new one.

Using Ben and Terry’s House Clearance Hackney Central London E8 service is the affordable and stress free way to remove your rubbish.

Prices start from as little as £50 and are based on the amount of our vehicle you fill. Unlike skip hire you pay for the space you use and there are no hidden fees for skip permits or parking suspensions.

Each house clearance team has two men who are fully insured to load from any location in and around your home.

Popular House Clearance Hackney Central London E8 services include:

House clearance

Garage clearance

Garden clearance

Loft clearance

Basement clearance

Offering you a bespoke service to suit both your needs and budget.

At Ben and Terry’s we guarantee that all rubbish we collect is disposed of responsibly with over 98% recycled or reused.

Unsure how much space you need?

No problem, simply call our House Clearance Hackney Central London E8 customer service team on: 020 3589 0314 who will be happy to offer help and advice.

 

Facts about Hackney Central London E8

Hackney Central is the central district of the London Borough of Hackney in London.

Hackney Central is the area that once would have been known as Hackney Village. This was a place that flourished from the Tudor period, when principal members of the Court had their houses in the surrounding area, and King Henry VIII of England had a palace (located near the modern Lea Bridge Road roundabout). Hackney Central remained a popular resort for Londoners until the end of the Georgian era, when this suburb of London began to be completely built up. Railways, trams and factories brought an end to Hackney’s rural atmosphere during the Victorian era, and its fortunes declined.

The industries of nearby Homerton and the Lee Valley have largely disappeared, leaving the NHS and local council as the largest employers. Successive waves of immigrants, both from abroad and within the United Kingdom, make modern Hackney a culturally vibrant part of inner London, with both the benefits and challenges that this brings.

Extensive post-World War II redevelopment replaced much of the housing stock, but the Georgian housing and Victorian terraces that remain have become popular again.

History

In Roman times Ermine Street passed to the west of what is now Hackney Central. Open oak and hazel woodlands covered the land with marshland around the rivers and streams that crossed the area. Hackney lay in the Catevallauni tribal territory.

The name Hackney derives from a 5th or 6th century Saxon settlement known as Haca’s ey – or raised ground in marshland. Hackney is not mentioned by name in the Norman Domesday Book; at that time it formed a part of the manor of Stepney.

Tudor village

Little remains of early Hackney, except the Tudor St Augustine’s Tower, which survives as Hackney’s oldest building; and the positively medieval road network. The churchyard, Hackney Brook, and the surrounding villages prevented Hackney’s expansion, and by 1605 the village had a lower rateable value than the other divisions of the parish. On the site of Brooke House college, in Clopton was sited one of Henry VIII’s palaces, where his daughter Mary took the Oath of Supremacy. Her guardian was Henry’s Principal Secretary of State Ralph Sadleir, a resident of Bryck Place, Homerton.

A further cluster of houses existed in medieval times, where Well Street enters Mare Street. The Loddiges family founded their extensive plant nursery business on open ground to the north-east of here in the 18th century.

Georgian period

The villages of Hackney, Lower Clapton and Homerton remained separated by fields into the 19th century. The fine houses remained, with large gardens behind. Artisans and labourers lived in cottages established in these gardens. There was not the room, or the will, for major rebuilding in the village. An early 18th-century mansion, now the New Landsdown Club, but once the headquarters of Elizabeth Fry’s British Ladies’ Society for Promoting the Reformation of Female Prisoners remains at 195 Mare Street. It is Grade II* listed, but in poor condition and on the English Heritage register of buildings at risk.

Victorian Hackney

During the Victorian era, many of the old buildings were swept away and the estates broken up to form streets of terraced housing. The arrival of the railway in 1850, with a great iron rail bridge crossing Mare Street marked the change from rural suburb to firmly urban. Trams began to make their appearance on the streets in the 1870s, and a tram depot opened in 1882 on Bohemia Place.

Increased access and the culverting of Hackney Brook in 1859–60, brought about the present road layout. Many older buildings were pulled down to intensify development and to make room for street widening and the railway. By the turn of the 20th century, only St Johns Gardens, and Clapton Square, the areas around the 1791 church, remained as public open space.

Source: Wikipedia