House Clearance Stoke Newington London E5

  • House Clearance London
    House Clearance London

Affordable House Clearance Stoke Newington London E5, single items – full loads. For an obligation free estimate call: 020 3589 0314 Price from just £50

House Clearance Stoke Newington London E5

Ben and Terry’s will remove all kinds of rubbish from your home and garden.

We can get rid of any old furniture, clear cuttings from your garden, takeaway rubbish after home improvement or renovation works, help de-clutter your property ready for sale or let, or simply remove your old sofa to make room for your new one.

Using Ben and Terry’s House Clearance Stoke Newington London E5 service is the affordable and stress free way to remove your rubbish.

Prices start from as little as £50 and are based on the amount of our vehicle you fill. Unlike skip hire you pay for the space you use and there are no hidden fees for skip permits or parking suspensions.

Each house clearance team has two men who are fully insured to load from any location in and around your home.

Popular House Clearance Stoke Newington London E5 services include:

House clearance

Garage clearance

Garden clearance

Loft clearance

Basement clearance

Offering you a bespoke service to suit both your needs and budget.

At Ben and Terry’s we guarantee that all rubbish we collect is disposed of responsibly with over 98% recycled or reused.

Unsure how much space you need?

No problem, simply call our House Clearance Stoke Newington London E5 customer service team on: 020 3589 0314 who will be happy to offer help and advice.

 

Facts about Stoke Newington London E5

Stoke Newington is an area occupying the north-west part of the London Borough of Hackney and nicknamed “Stokey” by many residents.

Reservoirs

From the 16th century onwards, Stoke Newington has played a prominent role in assuring a water supply to sustain London’s rapid growth. Hugh Myddleton’s New River runs through the area and still makes a contribution to London’s water. It used to terminate at the New River Head in Finsbury, but since 1946 its main flow has ended at Stoke Newington reservoirs. A slow ornamental trickle flows past the West Reservoir.

Stoke Newington East and West Reservoirs are quite substantial for urban facilities. Stoke Newington Reservoirs were constructed in 1833 to purify the New River water and to act as a water reserve. The West Reservoir is now a leisure facility, offering sailing, canoeing and other water sports, plus Royal Yachting Association-approved sailing courses. On its western edge stands the former filter house, now set out as a visitor centre with a café; some of the old hydraulic machinery remains in the main hall. The pumping station at the reservoir gates converted to a climbing centre in 1995.

Besides the water board facilities and the New River, Clissold Park contains two large ornamental lakes, a home to many water birds and a population of terrapins. These lakes – purportedly the remains of clay pits dug for the bricks used in the building of Clissold House – are all that is left to mark the course of the Hackney Brook, one of London’s lost rivers, which once flowed from west to east across Stoke Newington on its way to the River Lea. In flood at this point, the brook spanned 10 metres. The two lakes are not fed from the brook, which has disappeared into the maze of sewers under London, but from the mains supply – the New River.

Second World War

During World War II, much of the area was damaged in the Blitz and many were made homeless, although the level of destruction was much lower than in those areas of East London further south such as Stepney or Shoreditch or even in next-door Hackney. The death toll was also relatively low: almost three-quarters of civilian deaths being due to one incident on 13 October 1940 when a crowded shelter at Coronation Avenue off the high street received a direct hit. Like Hackney and Tottenham, Stoke Newington avoided most of the later V-weapon attacks, which fell disproportionately on South London; seven V-1s and two V-2s hit the borough.

Most of the historic buildings at the heart of Stoke Newington survived, at least in a repairable state. Two notable exceptions are the classically grand parish church of West Hackney, St James’s, on Stoke Newington Road, which dated from 1824, and St Faith’s, a Victorian Gothic church by William Burges. Both were so severely damaged, the former in the October 1940 bombing, and the latter by a flying bomb in 1944, that they were entirely demolished. St James’s was replaced after the war by a much more modest structure, St Paul’s, which is set well back from the street.

Source: Wikipedia